A better way to avoid public member invisibility and source code bloat/repetition with inherited class templates?

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Context:
Inheritance of protected and public class members is a fundamental concept of Object Oriented Programming. The trivial example below illustrates an often encountered situation in which the class CDerived inherits all public members of the class CBase and adds 1 additional function of its own without changing nor explicitly redeclaring nor redefining any of the public members of the CBase class.

#include <stdio.h>  class CBase { public:     char Arr[32];      int Fn1(void) {         return Arr[1] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr)-1];     }      int Fn2(void) {         return Arr[2] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr)-2];     } };   class CDerived : public CBase { public:       int FnSum(void) {         return Fn1() + Fn2();     } };  int main(void) {     CDerived ddd;      printf("%d/n", ddd.Fn1());     printf("%d/n", ddd.Fn2());     printf("%d/n", ddd.FnSum());      return (int)ddd.Arr[0]; }; 

The code above compiles without problems on all major compilers.

However, if one wishes to "templatize" this code, e.g.: by parametrizing the size of the Arr array, then all public members of CBase class template become invisible to the CDerived class template on compilers that conform to the latest C++ standard.
Below is the problem code:

#include <stdio.h>  template <unsigned int BYTES> class CBase { public:     char Arr[BYTES];      int Fn1(void) {         return Arr[1] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr)-1];     }      int Fn2(void) {         return Arr[2] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr)-2];     } };  template <unsigned int BYTES> class CDerived : public CBase<BYTES> { public:      int FnSum(void) {         return Fn1() + Fn2() + Arr[0];  // ERRORs: identifiers "Fn1" and "Fn2" and "Arr" are NOT found !     } };      int main(void) {     CDerived<32> ddd;      printf("%d/n", ddd.Fn1());  //No error here     printf("%d/n", ddd.Fn2());  //No error here     printf("%d/n", ddd.FnSum());      return (int)ddd.Arr[0];   //No error here } 

See:
MSVC v19.10: https://godbolt.org/g/eQKDhb
ICC v18.0.0: https://godbolt.org/g/vBBEQC
GCC v8.1: https://godbolt.org/g/GVkeDh

There are 4 solutions to this problem:

Solution #1: Prefix all of the references to members of the CBase class template (even the public ones), with CBase<BYTES>:: like this:

 int FnSum(void) {         return CBase<BYTES>::Fn1() + CBase<BYTES>::Fn2() + CBase<BYTES>::Arr[0];    } 

See:
MSVC v19.10: https://godbolt.org/g/48ZJrj
ICC v18.0.0: https://godbolt.org/g/BSPcSQ
GCC v8.1: https://godbolt.org/g/Vg4SZM

Solution #2: Prefix all of the references to members of the CBase class template (even the public ones), with this-> like this:

 int FnSum(void) {         return this->Fn1() + this->Fn2() + this->Arr[0];    } 

See:
MSVC v19.10: https://godbolt.org/g/oBs6ud
ICC v18.0.0: https://godbolt.org/g/CWgJWu
GCC v8.1: https://godbolt.org/g/Gwn2ch

Solution #3: Add a using statement inside the CDerived class template, for each reference to a member of the CBase class template (even the public ones), like this:

using CBase<BYTES>::Arr; using CBase<BYTES>::Fn1; using CBase<BYTES>::Fn2;  

See:
MSVC v19.10: https://godbolt.org/g/gJT8cX
ICC v18.0.0: https://godbolt.org/g/1RK84A
GCC v8.1: https://godbolt.org/g/d8kjFh

Solution #4: Disable the strict conformance to the C++ standard by enabling the "permissive" mode in the compiler settings, like this:

For MSVC v19.10 remove the switch /permissive-, see: https://godbolt.org/g/Yxw89Y
For ICC v18.0.0 add the switch -fpermissive, see: https://godbolt.org/g/DwuTb4
For GCC v8.1 add the switch -fpermissive, see: https://godbolt.org/g/DHGBpW

MSVC NOTE: According to this article, by default the /permissive- option is set in new projects created by Visual Studio 2017 v15.5 (MSVC compiler v19.11) and later versions. It is not set by default in earlier versions, ...including the latest Godbolt.org's Compiler Explorer MSVC version v19.10.

GCC NOTE: Even with the -fpermissive compiler switch, the GCC v8.1 compiler still needs the using CBase<BYTES>::Arr; statement inside the CDerived class (...or one of the other solutions) in order to make the public Arr array visible inside the CDerived class template ...but it does not need anything extra to make the Fn1() and Fn2() functions visible.

MSVC Non-Solution: According to this article and this article, the compilation error in MSVC comes from the Two-Phase Name Lookup being enabled by the conformance to the C++ standard mode ( the /permissive- option).
Also, according to the former article: "The /permissive- option implicitly sets the conforming two-phase lookup compiler behavior, but it can be overridden by using /Zc:twoPhase- switch".
However adding the two compiler switches /permissive- /Zc:twoPhase- does not cause the "templated" problem code to compile in MSVC v19.13, without the additions described in Solution #1 or #2 or #3.
NOTE: I am not including a link to http://godbolt.org with the illustration of this problem, because the latest MSVC compiler at Godbolt (v19.10) does not support the /Zc:twoPhase- compiler switch.

Problems with above Solutions:
Solution #4 is not portable and breaks away from the C++ standard. It is also a GLOBAL solution (global switch) to a local problem - usually a bad idea. A compiler switch that affects only a portion of the code (e.g. #pragma NOtwoPhase) does not exist.
Solutions #1 and #2 require many verbose additions to the code. This leads to a source code bloat that does not add any new functionality. For example if the CDerived class template adds only 2 functions to a CBase class that contains 5 public functions and 1 member variable, which are referenced multiple times in CDerived, the Solution #1 requires 14 verbose code alterations/additions in the derived class, which look like this:

    #include <stdio.h>       template <unsigned int BYTES>     class CBase     {     public:         char Arr[BYTES];          CBase() {             for (size_t i=1; i<sizeof(Arr); i++)             Arr[i] = Arr[i-1]+(char)i;         }             int Fn1(void) {             return Arr[1] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr)-1];         }          int Fn2(void) {             return Arr[2] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr) - 2];         }          int Fn3(void) {             return Arr[3] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr) - 3];         }          int Fn4(void) {             return Arr[4] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr) - 4];         }          int Fn5(void) {             return Arr[5] ^ Arr[sizeof(Arr) - 5];         }     };       template <unsigned int BYTES>     class CDerived : public CBase<BYTES>     {     public:          int FnSum(void) {             return CBase<BYTES>::Fn1() +             CBase<BYTES>::Fn2() +              CBase<BYTES>::Fn3() +              CBase<BYTES>::Fn4() +              CBase<BYTES>::Fn5() +              CBase<BYTES>::Arr[0] +             CBase<BYTES>::Arr[1] +             CBase<BYTES>::Arr[2];         }          int FnProduct(void) {             return CBase<BYTES>::Fn1() *              CBase<BYTES>::Fn2() *              CBase<BYTES>::Fn3() *              CBase<BYTES>::Fn4() *              CBase<BYTES>::Fn5() *              CBase<BYTES>::Arr[0] *             CBase<BYTES>::Arr[1] *             CBase<BYTES>::Arr[2];         }       };      int main(void)     {         CBase<64> bbb;         CDerived<32> ddd;          printf("%d/n", ddd.FnSum());         printf("%d/n", ddd.FnProduct());          return (int)ddd.Arr[0];     } 

In real life the Base class template might contain ~50 functions and many variables which are referenced multiple times in the Derived class template, which necessitate 100s of such repetitive edits !
There must be a better way...

Solutions #3 requires less work because it does not require finding and prefixing EVERY REFERENCE to the CBase member in the CDerived's code. The CBase members, that are used by CDerived, need to be "re-declared" with a using statement only once, regardless how many times these members are used/referenced in the CDerived's code. This saves a lot of mindless searching and typing.

Unfortunately a blanket statement like using CBase<BYTES>::* which makes all of the protected and public members visible in the derived class template, does not exist.

QUESTION 1:
Is there a less verbose portable solution to this problem ? e.g. Solution #5...

QUESTION 2:
Why doesn't the "MSVC Non-Solution" work ? In other words: Why doesn't the /Zc:twoPhase- compiler switch following the /permissive- switch cause the problem code to be compiled without errors, like with the /permissive- switch completely removed from MSVC v19.13?

P.S. This question is related to this question.


Use macros to simplify Solution #3 somewhat. Boost is not strictly necessary, but makes life easier.

#include <boost/preprocessor.hpp>  #define USING_ONE(r, base, member)              /     using base::member;  #define USING_ALL(base, ...)                    /     BOOST_PP_SEQ_FOR_EACH(                      /         USING_ONE, base,                        /         BOOST_PP_VARIADIC_TO_SEQ(__VA_ARGS__)   /     )  // Near CBase<BYTES> #define USING_CBASE(param) USING_ALL(CBase<param>, Arr, Fn1, Fn2, Fn3, Fn4, Fn5)  // In CDerived<BYTES>, in a `public:` section USING_CBASE(BYTES); 

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